RODNEY ATKINS

Guest Artist

Upcoming Performances

Content: 
Rodney Atkins performs at the Opry's Birthday Bash, 2012.
Rodney Atkins, 2009.
Rodney Atkins, 2007.
Rodney Atkins holds his GAC award for one of the top 10 videos of the year for his song "If You're Going Through Hell", 2007.
  • Rodney Atkins - "Caught Up In The Country" Watch and take a listen to the official music video for Rodney Atkins' new song "Caught Up In The Country", the lead single from his fifth studio album. The song features the Fisk Jubilee Singers from Nashville's Fisk University.
  • Rodney Atkins - "If You're Going Through Hell" The title song off Atkins' second studio album, "If You're Going Through Hell" was one of 4 number one singles on the Billboard country charts shortly after its release in 2006.

NEWS

Rodney Atkins Talks New Single "Caught Up In The Country"

Biography

Rodney Atkins knows the value of taking the long way home, of veering off the beaten path onto that road less traveled once in a while. You can hear it in his music, in the lyrics of his smash single, "Take A Back Road," a song that celebrates that feeling of getting away from the noise of everyday life, really living in the moment, and getting right with your soul. Rodney always remains true to himself and constantly strives to evolve and find unique ways of expressing himself through the music he puts out into the world. It's a philosophy he tries to employ throughout his life, and it has led him to some amazing places.

The East Tennessee native has an impressive track record with hitting on sentiments that strike a chord with the country listener: he's had six No. 1 hits from his first three albums, from "Watching You" and "These Are My People" to his most recent smashes, "Take A Back Road," and "Farmer's Daughter," (which quickly skyrocketed to platinum,) and he's sold over four million singles.

"The biggest challenge is finding the kind of songs that really set you apart," says Rodney. "You have to figure out what it is you came here to say and stick to that. I think you live and learn. I want to record songs that won't just be around for a little while. I look for stories people relate to. You don't want to be thinking about listening to a song, you want to be inside of it. It's like watching a movie."

Rodney is a hard-working, patriotic, rock-solid country boy that fans have grown to know and love since his debut with 2003's Honesty. Rodney always makes time for volunteer opportunities amidst his touring schedule, as well as for visits to the Holston Methodist Home for Children in Greeneville, TN, where he was adopted as a small child. After all, the road back to the tiny hometown where he got his start may be a long one, but for Rodney, nothing could ever beat the power returning home to your roots.

"I love the grit," says Rodney Atkins. "I love getting sawdust on me. I love getting under the hood and getting grease all over: working hard, until your knuckles are busted."

After more than two decades in country music, it's hard to imagine that the Tennessee-born Atkins could still treasure the difficult moments and the arduous process of creating a song from the ground up. But he's just the kind of artist who loves the roots as much as the tree. With six No. 1 hits under his belt, four studio LP's and over 13 million units sold, Atkins is more invested than ever in making honest, authentic records that tell a story and showcase his unique place in the world, which is exactly what he does on his forthcoming fifth LP. But it took a moment, about three years ago, for him to take stock not just of where he'd been, but where he was going.

"I equated it to my bow and arrow moment," Atkins says. "I felt like I needed to stop, take a few steps back. Re-aim. Re-adjust. Get back on target, and to the level I wanted to operate on."

It was a logical moment – in the wake of his first greatest hits compilation, Rodney Atkins Greatest Hits, in 2015, he wanted his next sonic offering to not only push country music forward but stay connected to what had always made it great to begin with. And, in Atkins' eyes, that's songs about the highways of life, family and love. And one true love, in particular. For Atkins, that's his wife Rose Falcon Atkins, to whom he owes so much of his creative reinvention. He credits Rose, a singer and artist herself, with helping him to find his voice again – to re-embracing melodies and the art of singing itself. Her fingerprints, whether lyrically, in a duet or just in spirit, are all over his forthcoming record.

"When I met Rose, the world made sense," Atkins says. And he started to see music in a whole new way, writing songs and searching for ones that explored that beloved grit but were tender, too; songs that could be blasted while driving down the road or after hunting in the field but tailor-made for first kisses and first dances -- songs that will live with his fans at every moment, because they lived with him, too.

"I'm a song mechanic," he says. "I just love working on songs." Whether writing with Rose or a stable of other revered co-writers, digging for the best jewels on Music Row or offering up his own versions of new classics like Jason Isbell's "Cover Me Up," his forthcoming record explores the many sides of an artist who is only moving forward and never too proud to do what makes him a little uncomfortable. From the southern swagger of "What Lonely Looks Like" or the timeless twang of "Caught Up in the Country," that pushes boundaries through a thunderous beat and vocals from the Fisk Jubilee Singers, they all paint a picture of a man who isn’t afraid to show what he loves – be it the country lifestyle or the woman by his side – because that's just who Atkins is. And that, he thinks, is what's most important.

"Authenticity is everything to me," says Atkins, who created much of the album from his own home studio in the hills of Nashville. "It's being honest, being real. Not being afraid to reveal that piece of you. It's about being willing to put it out there." Indeed, there are songs about fitting in and finding a place, about our weaknesses and joys, about watching children grow and about simply letting go. Known for his numerous hits including six chart-topping tracks: "Take A Back Road,” “It’s America,” “Cleaning This Gun (Come On In Boy),” “These Are My People,” “Watching You” and “If You’re Going Through Hell (Before the Devil Even Knows)" – it's a sonic progression that will excite and captivate both new fans and ones who have been on the ride all along.

And that road, for Atkins, has been an enviable one. His last studio LP, Take A Back Road (produced by Ted Hewitt), yielded his sixth career No. 1 hit and his fastest - rising single to date with the title track. And his 2006 single, "Watching You," was named the Number One Song of the Decade by Country Aircheck, an accolade that even found Atkins himself surprised. But it's on this newest record where Atkins sees the most accurate reflection of who he is as a man, and as a singer. This time, he focused on whether or not a song had staying power – beyond just the radio dials. But that's certainly where they'll be, too. "I believe in these songs," he says. "And that they are epic."

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